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Archive for the ‘Confusing Words’ Category

Important Confusing Words For SSC CGL Exam 

Important Confusing Words For SSC CGL Exam 

a lot/allot

A lot is two words meaning “much”: A lot of food was left after the party.

Allot means to give something to someone. He was allotted a house in Sector 13 by the government.

a while/awhile

A while is two words meaning “a short period of time”: I will meet you in a while.

Awhile means for a short time. Stand here for awhile.

accede/ exceed

Accede means “to agree or allow”: The principal finally acceded to accept the demands of its staff.

Exceed means “to go beyond, to surpass”: The amount of alcohol in his blood exceeded the level

allowed.

accept/except/expect

Accept means “to take willingly”: He accepted the proposal.

Except is a preposition meaning “excluding”: Everyone was disappointed with the party except Rajiv.

Expect means to look forward to something. We expect the chief guest to be here any moment.

adapt/adept/adopt

Adapt means “to adjust”: The hostellers quickly adapted themselves to the new atmosphere away from

their homes.

Adept means “skilled”: The guide is adept at speaking many languages fluently.

Adopt means to “accept as your own”: The actress wanted to adopt a child after the earthquake.

Important confusing
adverse/averse

Adverse means “unfavorable, hostile”: Those driving in adverse winter conditions may be putting themselves at risk.

Averse means “unwilling or repelled”: She was averse to the idea of getting married at 18.

advice/advise

Advice is a noun meaning “an opinion given with the intention of helping”: My mother still gives me

advice even though I’m 30 years old.

Advise is a verb meaning “to give counsel or advice”: The meteorologist advised listeners to stay

indoors because of the extremely cold temperatures.

auger/augur

An auger is a tool used for digging holes:

Augur means “to predict, forecast”: These signs augur bad news.

aid/aide

Aid is help or assistance given: Every Christmas the community gives aid to those less fortunate.

An aide is a person who helps: The nurse worked for five years as the doctor’s aide.

airs/heirs

Airs refers to snobbish and artificial behavior: She has developed airs from the time she has gone to

Delhi.

Heirs are people who, because they are family, will inherit an estate or title.As she had no heirs she

donated all her property.

all right/alright

All right is a phrase meaning “everything is right”: My answers were all right?

Alright is a single word meaning “OK”: Is everything alright here?

all together/altogether

All together is applied to people or things that are being treated as a whole: We always had fun when we

were all together.

Altogether is an adverb that means “completely or totally”: You are altogether wrong.

all ways/always

All ways means “by every means or method”: He tried all ways to trick the police but failed.

Always means “forever”: My father being a mature man always responds calmly during emergency

situations.

allude/elude

Allude means “to suggest indirectly”: For the dedicated searchers, there are clues hidden in the forest

which allude to the treasure’s location.

Elude means “to dodge or escape”: He tried to elude the police but finally he was caught.

allusion/illusion

An allusion is a subtle reference or hint: The author’s new book contains an allusion to mythological

gods.

An illusion is a deception, mirage, or a wild idea: If you think you can get a job by studying for two

hours daily you are under an illusion.

almost/most

Almost means “nearly all”( करीब करीब) : Almost all my friends have graduated from college by now.

Most is superlative of more, meaning “the greatest or to the highest degree”: My son is the most

brilliant boy I know.

aloud/Allowed

Aloud means “speaking so that someone else can hear you”: The teacher told him to read the paragraph

aloud.

Allowed means “having permission”: His boss allowed him to take the weekend off.

already/all ready

Already is an adverb that indicates an action is completed by a certain time: The chief guest had already

hoisted the flag when we reached.

All ready means “everything is completely prepared”: The children were all ready to go for the picnic.

alternate/alternative

Alternate means “something that occurs in turns.”: We were advised to attend the classes on alternate

days.

Alternative means “as an option” विकल्प : He had no other alternative but to accept his crime before

the judge.

ambiguous/ambivalent

Ambiguous describes a phrase or act with more than one meaning, or one that is unclear अस्पष्ट:

The ending of the short story is ambiguous.

Ambivalent means “uncertainty and having conflicting attitudes and feelings”: He was ambivalent as

to which candidate to vote for.

amiable/amicable

Amiable refers to a person who is friendly, good-natured, and pleasant: Sheela was very amiable and

liked immediately.

Amicable means “friendly and peaceable”, and is used to describe agreements or relationships between

groups or people: After years of disagreement, the two countries came to an amicable agreement.

among/between

Among is used for three or more: Sheela had to choose among three universities she might attend.

Between is used for two things: I couldn’t decide between blue and green.

amoral/immoral

Amoral means “having no principles at all, good or bad”: Pavan  is totally amoral; he is either helping

others or helping himself at their expense.

Immoral means “bad, lacking good principles”: Cheating in exams is considered immoral behavior

during student life.

amount/number

Amount is used with uncountable and abstract nouns: a large amount of money, amount of work,

amount of happiness or amount of dirt.

Number is used with countable and concrete plural expressions: a number of people, a number of

attempts, a number of novels, a number of trials.

amused/bemused

Amused is when something is entertaining: The children were amused by watching the kittens play.

Bemused means “bewildered” or “lost in thought”: Geeta was bemused by the unexpected ending to the

movie.

annual/annul

Annual means “yearly”: We must pay an annual tax.

Annul means “to make void or invalid”: They want to annul the marriage.

any one/anyone 

Any one means “any one person”: Any one of you may go, but not all of you.

Anyone means “anybody, any person at all”: Anyone can win a lottery.

anyway/anywhere/nowhere/anyways/anywheres/nowheres 

Anyway, anywhere, and nowhere are the correct forms.

apart/a part

Apart is an adverb meaning “in pieces”: My plan for my vacation fell apart due the sudden death of my

boss .

A part is a noun meaning “one section of”: A part of my heart left when he died.

appraise/apprise

Appraise is to assess or estimate the worth of: to appraise a diamond.

Apprise is to inform or notify: the officer apprised us of our rights.

arcane/archaic

Arcane refers to things known and understood by few people: Annu teaches philosophic  theories of

modern religion at the college.

Archaic refers to things very, very old and outdated: The Oxford English Dictionary contains many

words that are archaic.

as/like 

As may be used as a conjunction that introduce dependent clauses: George talks as his father does.

Informally, it may also be used as a preposition in comparative constructions like: He is as forgetful as

me (or as I am).

Like is a preposition is followed by a noun or pronoun: George looks like his mother. It may also be

used as an adjective meaning “similar”: George and I have like minds.

ascent/assent

Ascent is an upward movement: Lina’s ascent to the presidency of the company came slowly.

Assent means “to agree to”: Geeta could not begin the project unless management assented.

ascetic/aesthetic

An ascetic is a person who renounces all material comforts, often for religious devotion: the young

man lead his ascetic lifestyle despite his parents’ plans for him. It can also be used as an adjective: The

young man  led an   ascetic lifestyle which gave a lot of pain to his parents.

Aesthetic refers to the philosophy of beauty or the pleasing qualities of something: The statue created

by the novice was lacking in aesthetic qualities.

ascribe/describe  

Ascribe means “to attribute to”: She ascribed her feelings of jealousy to insecurity.

Describe means “to show what something is by drawing a picture with words”: Describe in detail what

the man looked like.

aspersion/dispersion

Aspersion is slander, a damaging remark: The campaign was filled with one aspersion after another.

Dispersion is the act of scattering: The dispersion of seeds was irregular because he sowed the seeds by

hand.

assistance/assistants    

Assistance is help or aid: the nurses gave assistance to the patients.

Assistants are more than one assistant, a person who gives help: the emergency room assistants were

ready to help anyone who came through the door.

Important confusing
assure/ensure/insure

Assure means “to guarantee”: He assured her it was a quality item.

Ensure means “to make sure by double checking”: The custodian ensured the doors to the school were

locked at night.

Insure means “to provide insurance”: It is wise to insure your house against flood, fire, or theft.

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Pinnacle SSC CGL CHSL English Confusing Words Part G

Pinnacle SSC CGL CHSL English Confusing Words Part G

In this post we shall discuss about “Confusing Words” and these are the most important for competitive exams.

Bascially we can say that Confusing words are those words which have same pronouciation but have different meanings and spellings. Such as Weak and Week.

We have started the series of confusing words. So Here is the list of some confusing words::

 

Passed/Past

Passed is the past tense of pass, to go by or move ahead of: The parade passed through town quickly.

Past is a place in time that was before now: We learn a lot from our past experiences.

 

Pasture/Pastor

A pasture is a place where farm animals graze: The dairy owner leaves his cows out into the pasture every   morning.

A pastor is a member of the clergy, a minister of a church:  Peter is the pastor of the local Baptist Church.

 

Patience/Patients

Patience is the ability to remain calm even when dealing with someone or something difficult: The teacher showed infinite patience for the students struggling with the reading material.

Patients are people who are sick in a hospital: The nurse had several new patients to get to know that week.

Pinnacle SSC CGL CHSL English Confusing Words
Peace/Piece

Peace is a sense of calm and absence of war or hostility: We all hope for peace throughout the world.

A piece is a part or segment of something: She just had a small piece of the cake.

 

Peer/Pier/Pyre

To peer is gaze strongly at: My driver  had to peer through fog to keep the car on the highway.

A peer is also an equal and almost of the same age group: Many children take up to smoking due to peer     pressure.

A pier is a walkway is a heavy structure usually built over water. The sunset looked beautiful standing on the pier.

A pyre is a pile of wood meant to be burnt, or a fire used to burn a corpse in a funeral.

 

Perspective/Prospective

A perspective is a view from a certain place or position or a mental outlook: The perspective from this building is spectacular

Prospective is an adjective that means “possible, likely to happen”: We have several prospective opportunities before us.

 

Plain/Plane

Plain means “simple” or “a large level region”:

The doctor advised him to have plain food as long as his stomach was upset.

My maternal uncle’s  farm was on a great plain where wheat grew well.

A plane an airplane: The new pilot landed the plane successfully.

 

Pour/Pore/Pore

To pour is to dispense liquid from one container into another: She poured some milk into the glass.

Pore also means “a small opening in skin through which moisture or air moves”: Pores are all over our bodies.

 

Practical/Practicable

Practical refers to being easily used and put into practice: A small folding knife has many practical uses.

Practicable means “feasible or possible”: It is not always practicable to study for twelve hours a day.

 

Precede/Proceed

The verb precede means “to come or go before, in front of”: The flower girl preceded the bride in the procession down the aisle.The script precedes the selection of the cast.

Proceed means “to move forward”: Both the flower girl and the bride proceeded down the aisle at the same time.

 

Premise/Premises

A premise usually means “assumption”: Since the basic premise was wrong, all the conclusions based on it were wrong, too.

Premises are a house or building and the grounds around it: Smoking is not allowed on the premises.

 

Presence/Presents

Presence means “the state of being near”: My sister’s presence was comforting in my time of sorrow.

Presents are gifts: The greatest gift is to let someone give you a present.

 

Principal/Principle

A principal is the head of a professional business or school: The principal of the middle school is a woman of principles.

A principle is a belief: I avoid meeting school principals as a matter of principle.

 

Profit/Prophet

Profit is the money earned above the expense it took to complete the project: My parents made a Rs10, 00,000 profit when they renovated and sold their house.

A prophet is a person who can foretell the future and through which a divine presence speaks: Atheism is a non- prophet religion.

 

Profligate/Prolific 

Profligate is to be wasteful and extravagant: The young lady  is so profligate that she spent the entire million dollars she won in the lottery in one year.

Prolific means “abundant, fruitful, producing much”: John Grisham is a prolific writer.

 

Quiet/Quite

Quiet means “without sound or mention of”: You are supposed to be quiet in hospitals and libraries.

Quite can mean either “completely or somewhat, rather”, depending on what you mean: I was quite alone that Saturday afternoon (completely) but the hours passed quite quickly (rather).

 

Quote/Quotation

Quote is a verb meaning “to state the exact words someone else said”: The pastor quoted scripture from the Bible or Carmen quoted a famous psychologist in complaining to the boss.

A quotation is the actual statement being quoted: The children of this class read a quotation every day.

 

Rain/Reign/Rein

Rain is the water that falls from the sky: People in dry areas look forward to the rain.

Reign is the rule of a king of queen: Balban reigned with an iron fist to keep peace in the land.

A rein (usually plural, reins) are the straps of leather used to control and guide a horse: No matter how hard the rider pulled on the reins, the horse would not slow down.

 

Raise/Raze

Raise means “to build or grow”: The farmer raises corn. The mason will raise the walls of a building by noon.

Raze is to destroy: The school was razed and a new one built in its place.

 

Real/Really

Real is a variant of really : She sings really well.

Really is an intensifying adverb: My children were really tired after playing outside all day.

 

Reality/Realty

Reality means “the perceived world as it is, the true situation”: She could not tell the difference between reality and fantasy. The reality is that very limited study material is available in regional languages.

Realty is land or real estate: Realty in large cities is markedly expensive.

 

Rebate/Refund

A rebate is a discount from the manufacturer to the customer after a purchase has been made: The Rs 6000 computer cost only Rs 4669  after all the rebates.

A refund is a full repayment to a dissatisfied customer: I returned the mobile and demanded a full refund.

 

Regimen/Regiment

Regimen is a systematic plan: The actress is undergoing a regimen for a healthier lifestyle.

Regiment is a troop of soldiers: The army is made up of several regiments.

 

Residence/Residents

A residence is where people live, the house or building: The mayor’s residence is located in the center of the city.

The residents are the people who live there: The residents of the community thinks the mayor’s residence is to luxurious.

 

Respectable/Respectful/Respective

Respectable means “deserving respect or on good behavior”: Mother always told us to be respectable in public.

Respectful refers to showing respect: Be respectful of the people around you, especially if they have sticks.

Respective means “individual and appropriate”: The summer camp kids were shown to their respective cabins.

 

Respectfully/ Respectively

Respectfully means “politely and with respect”: Everyone at Pinnacle  always dealt respectfully with each and every student.

Respectively refers to the order in which things are given: I gave the boy  and the girl  blue and green socks, respectively, means that I gave the boy  blue socks and the girl  green ones.

 

Restive/Restful

Restive means “impatient and nervous, restless”: The new apprentice became restive once he knew the boss was going to call him into his office.

Restful means “full of rest, calm, quiet, and restorative”: A restful vacation in Kerela was just what the doctored ordered.

 

Right/Rite/Write

Right means “correct”: She always knew the right thing to say.

A rite is a ceremony: Final rites for the deceased were held in the church.

To write is to express oneself in writing: The lady writes a page in her diary every night to vent her feelings.

Pinnacle SSC CGL CHSL English Confusing Words
Rise/Raise

Rise is intransitive and does not have an object: The sun rises in the east.

Raise always has an object: You can raise a crop on a farm or raise your hand in class.

 

Role/Roll

A role is a part in a play or movie: Once I did the role of Lakshman in our local Ram Lila.

Role can also mean “a function of”: What is the role of the police in the present day society?

Roll is a verb meaning “to turn over and over”: I rolled the blanket and put it in the trunk.

 

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Pinnacle SSC CGL CHSL English Confusing Words Part F 

Pinnacle SSC CGL CHSL English Confusing Words Part F

In this post we shall discuss about “Confusing Words” and these are the most important for competitive exams.

Bascially we can say that Confusing words are those words which have same pronouciation but have different meanings and spellings. Such as Weak and Week.

We have started the series of confusing words. So Here is the list of some confusing words::

 

Immemorial/Immortal

Immemorial refers to that which is beyond time, ancient: These artifacts have been here since time immemorial.

Immortal describes things that live forever: The way the man drives, he must think that he is immortal.

 

Implicate/ Imply

Implicate means “to closely link or connect”: The blood on his hands implicated him in the murder.

Imply means “to point to, or suggest indirectly”: The victim’s friend implied he thought he knew who the murderer was.

Pinnacle SSC CGL CHSL English Confusing
Imply/Infer

Imply means “to suggest indirectly”: Her hesitation implied that her answer was no.

Infer means “to draw a conclusion from known facts”: He inferred that the answer was no from her hesitation.

 

In regard to/As regards

Both of these mean “referring to”, but use one or the other: In regard to your proposal I have an idea, or: As regards your proposal, I have an idea. NOT in regards to!

 

Inchoate/Incoherent

Inchoate describes something in an early stage of development, and that is incomplete: Her plan remained inchoate and was developed no further.

Incoherent describes something that is lacking connection or order: Some even thought that her plan was just a few incoherent thoughts that didn’t work out together.

 

Incredible/Incredulous

Incredible means “astonishing or difficult to grasp”: The incredible power of a tornado attracts storm chasers.

Incredulous means “skeptical and disbelieving”: She was incredulous about Fred’s interpretation of the event.

 

Intolerable/Intolerant

Intolerable refers to something unbearable: The heat during the summer of 2005 was intolerable.

Intolerant refers to a person who is unable to accept differences in opinion, habit, or belief: Maya is intolerant of anyone who chews with their mouth open.

 

Irregardless/Regardless

Regardless is the correct word to use, meaning “without regard”: The young man left regardless of the warnings.

Irregardless is a double negative that should be avoided.

 

Its/It’s

Its is the possessive form of it, like hers, his, and theirs: The dog licked its foot after stepping in maple syrup.

It’s is short for ‘it is’, a contraction of those two words: “Well, I guess it’s [it is] time to wash the dog again.”

 

Latent/Patent

Latent means “present but not visible or active”: Just because I’m not in bed doesn’t mean that I don’t have a latent virus.

Patent means “visible, active, or obvious”: The claim that I pinched the girl is a patent lie as she stood ten metres away from me!

 

Later/Latter

Later means “afterward”: Come later than seven o’clock.

Latter means “the last of two things mentioned”: If I have to choose between brains or beauty, I’ll take the latter.

 

Lay/Lie

Lay is a transitive verb, which means it takes an object. It means “to set or put down flat”: The lady laid the child in the crib, or Lay a book on the table, please. Its forms are lay, lays, laid, has laid, and is laying.

Lie is an intransitive verb, so it does not take an object. It means “to rest supine or remain in a certain place”: I have to lie down because I’m not feeling well, or I like to lie in the grass for hours. Its forms are lie, lies, lay, has lain, and is lying.

 

Lead/Led

Lead can be a verb meaning “to guide, be in charge of”: Gurmeet will lead a group this afternoon. It can also be a noun meaning “a type of metallic element”: Use a lead pencil to fill in your answer sheet.

Led is the past tense of lead: Gurmeet led the group this afternoon.

 

Lend/Loan/Borrow

Lend is a verb that mean “to temporarily give something to someone”: Lucy will lend her bicycle to me for a day. A loan is a noun meaning something borrowed: Most people get a bank loan to buy a house. Loan is also used in American English as a verb meaning “to lend”.

Borrow is to receive something from someone temporarily: Can I borrow the book if I promise to return it tomorrow?

 

Lessen/Lesson

Lessen means “to decrease or make less”: She lessened the headache pain with aspirin.

A lesson is something you learn: A teacher might say, “Today’s lesson is about ancient Egypt.”

 

Liable/Libel

Liable means “legally responsible for or subject to”: Tom is liable to pay for the damage if he doesn’t prove his innocence.

Libel is a noun that means “a slanderous statement that damages another person’s reputation”: The man was sued for libel for what he printed about his neighbor.

 

Lightening/Lightning

Lightening is a verb that means “to reduce the weight of”: My course load needs lightening if I am to complete this course successfully.

Lightning refers to the electrical discharge in the sky: Fred captured the image of a bolt of lightning on film.

 

Loathe/Loath

Loathe is a verb meaning “to detest or dislike greatly”: Maneka Gandhi  loathes animal cruelty.

Loath is an adjective meaning “reluctant, unwilling”: Lokesh was loath to ask for an extension on his term paper  that semester.

 

Loose/Lose

Loose is not tight: A loose-fitting jacket was more suitable than a shawl.

Lose is to misplace and not be able to find: I often lose my bearings when entering a new city. Thank goodness I don’t lose my keys though!

 

Manner/Manor

Manner is a way of doing or behaving: My neighbor  did the plumbing work  in an expert-like manner.

A manor is a house on an estate: The chauffeur drove slowly up to the manor.

 

Mantel/Mantle

A mantel is the shelf above a fireplace, or face of one: The lady placed several candles on the mantel.

A mantle is a cloak or blanket: Karuna grabbed her mantle before heading out the door.

 

Marital/Martial

Marital refers to marriage: Both of them are having marital problems.

Martial refers to war or warriors: Bunny has a black belt in martial arts.

 

Marshal/Marshall

A marshal is an officer of highest ranking;The marshal gave orders to the troops.

Marshall is a verb meaning “to together”: The drunk boy gathered  enough strength to walk past the bar on his way home.

 

Meet/Mete/Meat

Meet means “to get together or connect with someone, to encounter”: Anu plans to meet a colleague for lunch.

Mete means “to distribute”: We had to mete out the last of the water when we were still 20 miles from civilization on our hiking trip.

Meat is flesh that may be eaten: Nilesh  is a vegetarian who doesn’t eat meat at all.

 

Militate/Mitigate

Militate means “to influence toward or against a change”: His coming late to office militated against his promotion.

Mitigate means “to lessen, make easier, or bearable”: The medicine mitigated the pain.

 

Mute/Moot

Mute means “having no sound or without speech”: He was struck mute by the horror of the events.

Moot as a noun is a public meeting; as an adjective, the more common usage, means “open to debate” in the UK and “not open to debate” in the US. It is most often used in the phrase moot point: When the leader walked in, the question of who was going to become his deputy became moot.

 

Noisome/Noisy

Noisome means “disgusting, offensive, and potentially harmful”: A noisome smell arose from the garbage can.

Noisy means “making a lot of sound or racket”: With so many children, the park became a noisy place in the evening.

 

Obeisance/Obsequious

Obeisance is respect and homage paid someone: The man  greeted the queen with sincere obeisance.

Obsequiousness is submissiveness and an eagerness to obey: The obsequiousness of the waiter made them roll their eyes.

Pinnacle SSC CGL CHSL English Confusing
Obtuse/Abstruse

Obtuse means “lacking quickness of wit or sensitivity, dull, dense”: The boy is so obtuse he doesn’t even know  when he is being insulted.

Abstruse means “too difficult to understand for the average mind”: The professor presented an abstruse metaphysical concept that went over our heads.

 

Overdo/Overdue

Overdo is to exaggerate something: The lady overdoes her makeup every morning before she goes to office.

Overdue indicates something that has missed its deadline: You must return these overdue books to the library immediately.

 

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SSC CGL Confusing Words : (Part – E) | Pinnacle Coaching 

SSC CGL Confusing Words : (Part – E) | Pinnacle Coaching

In this post we shall discuss about “Confusing Words” and these are the most important for competitive exams.

Basically we can say that Confusing words are those words which have same pronunciation but have different meanings and spellings. Such as Weak and Week.

We have started the series of confusing words. So Here is the list of some confusing words::

 

1.  Fair/fare

A fair is an exhibition of farm produce usually with a collection of rides and attractions: Every year our family goes to the state fair.

A fare is the fee you pay to ride public transportation: The fare to ride the bus is affordable in our town.

 

2. farther/further

Farther has to do with distance: How much farther is it to Delhi?

Further means “additional” or “more”: Please give me further information about the best route to Delhi.

 

3. faze/phase

Faze is to distress or disturb: The scrutiny of the media didn’t faze the new leader.

A phase is a period of development or a period of time in a cycle of events: The teenager  went through a phase    when all he did was eat junk food.

 

4. few/less

Few is used when talking about things that can be counted: Leena has a few ideas; also a few keys, few clouds, few values, few diseases.

Less is used when talking about things that can’t be counted: Leena shows less perseverance than we expected; also less distance, less pollution, less rain.

 

5. figuratively/literally

Figuratively refers to metaphoric speech, not realistic or exact: To say, “Hari died laughing,” is to speak figuratively.

Literally refers to realistic or exact speech: If Hari  literally died laughing, he must be buried (but it was not        such a bad way to go).

ssc cgl confusing words

6. flammable/inflammable

These two words both mean “easily set on fire”: a highly flammable/inflammable substance. However, flammable is now used as a warning to avoid misinterpreting the prefix in- as negation.

 

7. flare/flair

Flare is to increase greatly, burn brightly, or something that provides a bright flame: The fire in the grill flared    brightly when Eva tossed gasoline on it.

Flair refers to a sense of style or a talent: The host has a flair for entertaining a group of men.

 

8. flaunt/flout

To flaunt means “to show off”: The young bride likes to flaunt her jewels at parties.

To flout means “to show scorn or contempt for”: Leena flouts the speed limit in every state when it suits her schedule.

 

9. forbear/forebear

Forbear means “to refrain from”: The children simply could not forbear laughing in the library.

A forebear is an ancestor or forefather: Our forebears who founded this country centuries ago.

 

10. foreword/forward

A foreword is a short introduction at the beginning of a book usually written by someone other than the author: The foreword of the book explains how its thesis fits in with current thinking.

Forward is an adverb indicating movement ahead or toward the front: Pintu moves forward slowly in the line    at the grocery store.

 

11. forth/fourth

Forth means “forward, from this point”: Ballu  moved forth without looking back.

Fourth indicates an object that comes between No. 3 and No. 5: The maid servant just finished cleaning the fourth floor.

 

12. foul/fowl

Foul can means “offensive, rotten, or unfavorable”: Foul language, foul meat, and foul weather are unacceptable at a picnic.

Fowl refers to birds, especially domestic ones: Chickens, ducks, geese, and turkeys are considered fowl.

 

13. found/founded

Found is the past tense of find: I found my glasses only after I had stepped on them!

Founded is past tense of the verb found, meaning “to set up or establish”: My ancestors were the ones who founded this country.

 

14. founder/flounder

Founder means one who laid the foundation for something: Jamshed ji Tata is the founder of steel industry in India.

Founder means “to run aground”: The boat foundered on a shoal in the storm.

Flounder means “to move clumsily, with difficulty” or “to blunder”.

 

Start From (G).

 

15. gibe/gybe/jibe

Gibe means “to taunt, jeer, make fun of”: His classmates gibed him for wearing his underwear over his clothes during the fancy dress competition.

Gybe means “to swing a fore-and-aft sail from one side of a sailboat to the other to change course”: When the     wind shifted, Ravi  gybed when he should have tacked.

Jibe refers to being in agreement: Our views on everything from baseball to Socrates seem to jibe.

 

16. gorilla/guerrilla

A gorilla is a large ape: Gorillas live in the African tropical forest.

A guerrilla is a member of irregular military that uses surprise attacks on its enemy: Guerrilla warfare uses tactics such as espionage, sabotage, and ambush.

 

Starting From (H)

 

17. hail/hale

Hail means “to greet or to come from”: She hails from California.

Hail also means “balls of ice”: Hail damaged the crops.

Hale means “sound or healthy”: Minny is hale and hearty enough to run five miles daily.

 

18. hanged/hung

Hanged is past tense of hang in the sense of executing someone by using a rope around the neck: The terrorist was hanged amid tight security.

Hung is the past tense of hang, but is used for things: My little son never hung up his clothes at the right place.

 

19. hardly

This is a word used in a negative sense meaning “barely”: She could hardly keep her eyes during the class  as she had not slept properly the previous night.

 

20. herd/heard

A herd is a group of animals: My little son  saw a herd of cows in the pasture.

Heard is the past tense of hear :The old lady heard the bells ringing for the glorious leader who had recently died.

 

21. here/hear

Here refers to the place where you are: You should come here more often.

Hear is to listen with the ears: Am I speaking loud enough for you to hear me?

 

22. heroin/heroine

Heroin is an illicit drug: Heroin is a very addicting substance.

A heroine is a female hero in in a story or movie.

 

23. historic/historical

Historic refers to something in history that was important: The summit was a historic meeting between the countries.

Historical refers to anything in general history: The whole class had to dress in historical costumes for the play.

 

24. hoard/horde

Hoard means “to collect and keep for oneself”: Squirrels hoard acorns during the winter.

A horde is a large group: Hordes of people go Christmas shopping the day after Thanksgiving.

ssc cgl confusing words

25. hole/whole

A hole is a gap or space: A moth made a hole in my sweater.

Whole means “complete”: Sheela ate the whole pizza herself!

 

26. home/hone

Home in is the correct phrase here is when referring to getting closer to a goal or target: The missile homed in electronically on the target.

Hone means “to sharpen”: Deepti made a resolution to hone her cooking skills as she was about to get married.

 

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Pinnacle SSC CGL CHSL English Confusing Words Part D

Pinnacle SSC CGL CHSL English Confusing Words Part D

In this post we shall discuss about “Confusing Words” and these are the most important for competitive exams.

Bascially we can say that Confusing words are those words which have same pronouciation but have different meanings and spellings. Such as Weak and Week.

We have started the series of confusing words. So Here is the list of some confusing words::

 

1. Dairy/Diary

A dairy is a farm where milk and milk products are produced: We get fresh milk from the dairy everyday.

A diary is the daily journal kept: The boy writes in his diary for two hours every night.

 

2. Desert/Dessert

Desert means “to abandon” He deserted his family when he got a good job in the city.

Dessert is the sweet course of a meal: The whole family wanted to have cake for dessert.

 

3. Device/Devise

A device is an instrument used to perform a task: This device will peel apples for you

Devise is to create or invent: They will devise a scheme to continue the business.

 

4. Divers/Diverse  

Divers means “several”: You can take that statement in divers ways.

Diverse means “different or varied”: There are many diverse cultures in the world.

 

5. Discreet/Discrete

Discreet means “modest and prudent”: Please be discreet about the surprise party, we don’t want her to find out.

Discrete means “separate and distinct”: Even though they were married, they kept their money in two discrete accounts.

Pinnacle SSC CGL CHSL English
6. Disinterested/Uninterested

Disinterested is an adjective that means “unbiased or impartial”: Since she had nothing to do with the house, she was a disinterested party in the matter.

Uninterested means “not interested”: Anita was just uninterested in the offer.

 

7. Each other/One another

Use each other when only two objects are involved: The twins love each other.

Use one another in referring to more than two objects: The triplets all love one another.

 

8. Each/Every

These are singular distributive pronouns; use them with a singular verb. Each refers to a single individual in a group: Each of us voted differently.

Every refers to all the members of a group inclusively: Every one of us voted the same.

 

9. Illicit/Elicit

Elicit is a verb that means “to draw out”: The teacher had trouble eliciting responses from the students.

Illicit is an adjective meaning “illegal or illegitimate”: Illicit drugs or illicit behavior may help you enter jail.

 

10. Emigrant/Immigrant  

An emigrant is a person who leaves his native country to settle in another: The emigrants left everything behind in search of something more.

An immigrant refers is person who moves to a new country: Many immigrants settle in this country every year.

 

11. Emigrate/Immigrate

Emigrate from means “to leave one’s country”: Many indians emigrated to the US.

Immigrate to means “to settle in another country”: Her family immigrated to the US four generations ago.

 

12. Eminent/Emanant/Imminent 

Eminent means “of high rank, outstanding, or prestigious”: An eminent author came to read at the university.

Emanant means “sending or issuing forth”: Emanant thoughts like those should be kept to yourself.

Imminent means “close to happening or near”: Everyone waited anxiously for an imminent storm predicted to arrive shortly.

 

13. Enervate/Innervate 

Innervate means “to supply with nerves or vitality”: The therapist innervated the shoulders with massage.

Enervate is to weaken or destroy the vitality of: The negative attitude enervated her enthusiasm.

 

14. Entomology/Etymology 

Entomology refers to the study of insects: Danny couldn’t be afraid of bugs if he wanted to get a degree in entomology.

Etymology is the study of the history of words and where they come from: The etymology of mortify goes back to Latin mortuus “dead”

 

15. Ethereal/Ephemeral

Ethereal describes something that is light, airy, and intangible: Ethereal clouds hovered above; Everything in the ballroom looked ethereal.

Ephemeral refers to anything lasting for a short period: Truth can be an ephemeral thing; A creek can be ephemeral if it disappears in the middle of summer.

 

16. Everyone/Every one

Everyone means “each person”: Everyone in the room must leave immediately.

Every one refers to each thing or person individually: The baker put every one of the eggs in the basket.

Pinnacle SSC CGL CHSL English
17. Explicit/Implicit

Explicit means “clear and direct”: Please give me explicit directions.

Implicit means “indirectly, with some parts understood”: They implicitly agreed to never talk on the subject again.

 

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SSC CGL Confusing Word Part C

SSC CGL Confusing Word Part C

In this post we shall discuss about “Confusing Words” and these are the most important for competitive exams.

Basically we can say that Confusing words are those words which have same pronunciation but have different meanings and spellings. Such as Weak and Week.

We have started the series of confusing words. So Here is the list of some confusing words::

1Canvas/Canvass

Canvas is cloth or fabric: a canvas bag to bring to the beach.

Canvass means “to seek votes”:

2. Capital/Capitol  

A capital is where the seat of government is: The capital of the United States is Washington DC.

Capital can also mean “wealth” or “a large letter”.

Write your name in capital letters. We were short of capital for the business.

The Capitol (usually capitalized) is the actual building in which the government and legislature meets: We will  travel to the Capitol this weekend.

3. Censor/Sensor/Censure

Censor is to prohibit free expression: The board decided to censor all the objectionable scenes in the movie.

A sensor is something that interprets stimulation: The low oil sensor lit up indicating a lack of oil within the engine

Censure is rebuke, harsh criticism: He was severely censured for putting the frog in the water cooler.

4. Cite/Site/Sight 

Cite means “to quote or mention”: He cited a famous theorist in his speech.

Site is a noun meaning “a place”: At which site will we stage the party? I visited the factory site in the morning.

Sight is a noun meaning “view”: The sight from Burj Khalifa is spectacular.

5. Climactic/Climatic   

Climactic refers to the peak: The police reached  right at the climactic moment of a movie.

Climatic refers to the climate and weather: London is known for its sudden climatic changes.

SSC CGL Confusing Word
6. Coarse/Course

Coarse is an adjective meaning “rough, big-grained, not fine”: We need to use coarse sandpaper to remove  the paint from this wood.

Course is a noun referring to a direction (the course of a ship) or a series of lectures on one subject (a history course in college): The meditation course that he took last year changed the course of his life.

7. Collaborate/ Corroborate

Collaborate means “to work together”: Collaborate with the people on your team.

Corroborate means “to support with evidence” or “prove true”: The testimony was corroborated with evidence of his innocence.

8. Complement/Compliment

Complement means “to supplement” or “make complete”: Their two personalities complement each other.

Compliment means “to praise or congratulate”: She received a compliment on her sense of fashion.

9. Compose/Comprise

Compose means to “make up” and is often used in the passive voice: The class at Pinnacle is composed of students of various states in India.

Comprise means “have, consist of, or include”: Students of several nationalities comprise the class. A rule to remember would be that the whole comprises its parts, and the parts compose the whole.

10. Concurrent/Consecutive

Concurrent simultaneous or happening at the same time as something else: concurrent election rallys in three different states.

Consecutive means “successive or one after another”: The state had three consecutive floods that month.

11. Conform/Confirm

Conform means “to be similar to”: These measurements conform to the blueprints.

Confirm is to make sure or double check: to confirm a flight reservation.

12. Connote/Denote

Connote means to “imply or suggest”: Our body language connotes how we feel even if we don’t say a word.

Denote means to “indicate specifically, to mean”: A red light denotes that one has to stop.

13. Conscience/Conscious

Conscience is the feeling or knowledge of right and wrong: My conscience wouldn’t allow me to compete with someone so much weaker than me.

Conscious refers to being awake and aware: The driver was still conscious after the accident and he gave the details to the police.

14. Continual/Continuous

Continual means “repeated with breaks in between”: We need continual rain throughout the summer for crops to grow.

Continuous means “without stopping”: The continuous drumming of the drum during the parade disturbed the peace of the neighbourhood.

15. Convince/Persuade

Convince is to cause another to feel sure or believe something to be true: Well, this book ‘Greenpasture’ has convinced me that aliens do exist.

Persuade is to talk someone into doing something: My father persuaded me to help him wash his car.

16. Co-operation/Corporation

Co-operation means “working together”: I would like to thank you for your cooperation on the project.

A corporation is a large company: Presidents of large corporations receive tens of millions of dollars in salary.

17. Corps/Core/Corpse

corpse  Corps (pronounced ‘core’) is an organization of people dedicated to a single goal: Lucy joined the Peace Corps after college.

A core is the center of a fruit containing seeds: My dog eats the apple core and all of it along with the seeds.

A corpse is a dead body: The corpse of Danny’s dog was lovingly laid to rest in the back yard.

18. Correspondence/Correspondents

Correspondence is agreement or written communication such as letters or news articles: Rajiv and Ranjan continued their correspondence for years.

Correspondents are those who write this communication: Nilesh has lived abroad as a news correspondent for several years.

19. Could Not Care Less

This expression is often confusing . It is always used with a negative and means that you really don’t care at all: Since she was sick, Mona could not care less about doing her homework.

20. Council/Counsel/Consul

A council is a group of people called together to meet on an issue: The school board council meets every Thursday evening.

Counsel is advice: I always go to Chander for counsel on the tough decisions in my life.

A consul is a diplomat appointed to protect the citizens and commercial interests of one country in another: If   you need help starting a business in France, talk to the US consul in Paris.

21. Creak/Creek

Creak can be the noun or verb for a squeak or groan: The creak of the floorboards alerted the sailor that the captain was sneaking up on him.

A creek is a small stream: The kids loved to play in the creek on a hot summer day.

22. Credible/Creditable

Credible means “believable or reliable”: There is no credible evidence that it was I who broke the lamp.

Creditable means “worthy of praise or respect”: I couldn’t have broken the lamp because I have a creditable ability.

SSC CGL Confusing Word
23. Criteria/Criterion

Criterion is singular: There is only one criterion for this job.

Criteria is plural: Several criteria need to be met in order for us to move forward.

24. Custom/Costume

A custom is a cultural tradition: It is a custom in Japan to remove your shoes when entering a home.

A costume is the outfit worn to represent a particular time, event, or culture: What is your costume for fancy dress going to be?

25. Congenial/Congenital

Congenial describes something likeable, suitable to taste: They enjoy the congenial surroundings in their home.

Congenital refers to a condition present at birth because of heredity: The child has a congenital heart defect.

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SSC CGL English Confusing Word / SSC CHSL English Confusing Words Part B

SSC CGL English Confusing Word / SSC CHSL English Confusing Words

In this post we shall discuss about “Confusing Words and these are the most important for competitive exams.

Bascially we can say that Confusing words are those words which have same pronunciation but have different meanings and spellings. Such as Weak and Week.

We have started the series of confusing words. So Here is the list of some confusing words::

1. Bad/Badly   

Bad is an adjective used after verbs like am, feel, is, seem, and become: They felt bad. (Using badly here would mean that their skill at feeling is poor).

Badly is an adverb used after other verbs: They played badly .

Badly can also mean “greatly”: They needed food badly.

2. Baited/bated   

Baited usually refers to traps: Baiting deer in order to hunt them is illegal in most states.

Bated is seldom used but means “reduced, abated”: Jessica bated her pace to let her running mate catch up.

3. Bare/Bear   

Bare means “naked”: Walking in grass with bare feet is refreshing.

Bear is the animal, and also means “to carry”: Sherman must bear the burden of flunking math twice.

4. Bazaar/Bizarre  

Bazaar is an exhibition, market, or fair: The Saturday morning bazaar is worth seeing even if you buy nothing.

Bizarre means “weird and unworldly”: Barry told us a bizarre story last night.

5. Beside/Besides

Beside means “next to”: Place the dishes beside the sink.

Besides is an adverb or preposition that means “also, additionally”: I would enjoy going on a vacation besides going shopping.

Besides English your maths should also be strong to clear the exam.

6. Biannual/Biennial   

Biannual is twice in one year: My trip to the dentist is a biannual event.

Biennial means “every two years”: These flowers are biennial; they bloom every two years.

7. Bimonthly/Semimonthly 

Bimonthly means “every two months”: We order from the co-op bimonthly.

Semimonthly means “twice a month (biweekly)”: We have our house cleaned semimonthly.

8. Lithe/Lithe   

Blithe, an adjective, means “lighthearted and carefree”: A blithe mood overcomes us in the spring.

Lithe is also an adjective but it means “flexible, graceful, and supple”: The lithe movements of the yoga instructor impressed us all.

9. By/Buy/Bye   

By is a preposition meaning “next to”: Park the car by the house.

Buy means “purchase”: Grandpa buys an ice cream cone every Sunday afternoon.

Bye means “farewell or good-bye”: Bye, now; I’ll see you later.

SSC CGL English Confusing Word
10. Board/Bored  

Board means a few things. One is “a long sheet of wood”: He had to cut the board to make the shelves. It also means “a committee”: The board of directors met to decide the fate of the school. Lastly, it can mean”to get onto”: She boarded the ship.

Bored means “not interested”: She is bored by the lecture.

11. Bore/Boar/Boor    

A bore is a boring or tiresome person or thing: Jasper is such a bore when he talks about his cats!

A boar is a male pig: Wild boars abound in this forest.

A boor is an unrefined, vulgar person: What a boor Rajiv was to get drunk at the wedding and embarrass everyone.

12. Born/Borne  

Born is newly coming into life: A child was born at 12:01 New Year’s day.

Borne means “carried”: All gossip is borne by an ill wind.

13. Borrow/Lend/Loan     

Borrow is to receive something from someone temporarily: to borrow a book and then return it.

Lend is a verb that mean “to temporarily give something to someone”.

Loan is a noun: a bank loan. Loan is often used in American English as a verb meaning “to lend”: Loan me a book, please.

14 . Brake/Break     

Brake means “to stop”: You should brake slowly on ice.

Break means “to smash”: To break a mirror brings seven years of worse luck than you are having now.

15. Breath/Breathe

Breath is a noun meaning “the air pulled into the lungs”: Take a deep breath and relax.

Breathe, with an E on the end, is a verb: Just breathe deeply and calm down.

16. Bridal/Bridle 

Bridal has to do a bride and her wedding: Sheela threw her bridal bouquet to the screaming crowd of single women.

A bridle is a halter or restraint, such as a horse bridle.

Pinnacle SSC CGL CHSL English Confusing Words Part B
17. Belief/Believe  

Belief is a noun: He had strong beliefs.

Believe is a verb: She believes she can do anything.

 

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Confusing words for SSC CGL | SSC CGL & CHSL Best Online coaching

Confusing words for SSC CGL | SSC CGL & CHSL Best Online coaching

a lot/allot

A lot is two words meaning “much”: A lot of food was left after the party.

Allot means to give something to someone. He was allotted a house in Sector 13 by the government.

a while/awhile

A while is two words meaning “a short period of time”: I will meet you in a while.

Awhile means for a short time. Stand here for awhile.

accede/ exceed

Accede means “to agree or allow”: The principal finally acceded to accept the demands of its staff.

Exceed means “to go beyond, to surpass”: The amount of alcohol in his blood exceeded the level allowed.

accept/except/expect

Accept means “to take willingly”: He accepted the proposal.

Except is a preposition meaning “excluding”: Everyone was disappointed with the party except Rajiv.

Expect means to look forward to something. We expect the chief guest to be here any moment.

adapt/adept/adopt

Adapt means “to adjust”: The hostellers quickly adapted themselves to the new atmosphere away from their homes.

Adept means “skilled”: The guide is adept at speaking many languages fluently.

Adopt means to “accept as your own”: The actress wanted to adopt a child after the earthquake.

adverse/averse

Adverse means “unfavorable, hostile”: Those driving in adverse winter conditions may be putting themselves at risk.

Averse means “unwilling or repelled”: She was averse to the idea of getting married at 18.

advice/advise

Advice is a noun meaning “an opinion given with the intention of helping”: My mother still gives me advice even though I’m 30 years old.

Advise is a verb meaning “to give counsel or advice”: The meteorologist advised listeners to stay indoors because of the extremely cold temperatures.

auger/augur

An auger is a tool used for digging holes:

Augur means “to predict, forecast”: These signs augur bad news.

aid/aide

Aid is help or assistance given: Every Christmas the community gives aid to those less fortunate.

An aide is a person who helps: The nurse worked for five years as the doctor’s aide.

airs/heirs

Airs refers to snobbish and artificial behavior: She has developed airs from the time she has gone to Delhi.

Heirs are people who, because they are family, will inherit an estate or title.As she had no heirs she donated all her property.

all right/alright

All right is a phrase meaning “everything is right”: My answers were all right?

Alright is a single word meaning “OK”: Is everything alright here?

all together/altogether

All together is applied to people or things that are being treated as a whole: We always had fun when we were  all together.

Altogether is an adverb that means “completely or totally”: You are altogether wrong.

all ways/always

All ways means “by every means or method”: He tried all ways to trick the police but failed.

Always means “forever”: My father being a mature man always responds calmly during emergency situations.

allude/elude

Allude means “to suggest indirectly”: For the dedicated searchers, there are clues hidden in the forest which allude to the treasure’s location.

Elude means “to dodge or escape”: He tried to elude the police but finally he was caught.

allusion/illusion

An allusion is a subtle reference or hint: The author’s new book contains an allusion to mythological gods.

An illusion is a deception, mirage, or a wild idea: If you think you can get a job by studying for two hours daily you are under an illusion.

almost/most

Almost means “nearly all”( करीब करीब) : Almost all my friends have graduated from college by now.

Most is superlative of more, meaning “the greatest or to the highest degree”: My son is the most brilliant boy I know.

aloud/Allowed

Aloud means “speaking so that someone else can hear you”: The teacher told him to read the paragraph aloud.

Allowed means “having permission”: His boss allowed him to take the weekend off.

already/all ready

Already is an adverb that indicates an action is completed by a certain time: The chief guest had already hoisted the flag when we reached.

All ready means “everything is completely prepared”: The children were all ready to go for the picnic.

alternate/alternative

Alternate means “something that occurs in turns.”: We were advised to attend the classes on alternate days.

Alternative means “as an option” विकल्प : He had no other alternative but to accept his crime before the judge..

ambiguous/ambivalent

Ambiguous describes a phrase or act with more than one meaning, or one that is unclear अस्पष्ट:

The ending of the short story is ambiguous.

Ambivalent means “uncertainty and having conflicting attitudes and feelings”: He was ambivalent as to which candidate to vote for.

Confusing words for SSC CGL
amiable/amicable

Amiable refers to a person who is friendly, good-natured, and pleasant: Sheela was very amiable and liked immediately.

Amicable means “friendly and peaceable”, and is used to describe agreements or relationships between groups or people: After years of disagreement, the two countries came to an amicable agreement.

among/between

Among is used for three or more: Sheela had to choose among three universities she might attend.

Between is used for two things: I couldn’t decide between blue and green.

amoral/immoral

Amoral means “having no principles at all, good or bad”: Pavan  is totally amoral; he is either helping others or helping himself at their expense.

Immoral means “bad, lacking good principles”: Cheating in exams is considered immoral behavior during student life.

amount/number

Amount is used with uncountable and abstract nouns: a large amount of money, amount of work, amount of happiness or amount of dirt.

Number is used with countable and concrete plural expressions: a number of people, a number of attempts, a number of novels, a number of trials.

amused/bemused

Amused is when something is entertaining: The children were amused by watching the kittens play.

Bemused means “bewildered” or “lost in thought”: Geeta was bemused by the unexpected ending to the movie.

annual/annul

Annual means “yearly”: We must pay an annual tax.

Annul means “to make void or invalid”: They want to annul the marriage.

any one/anyone

Any one means “any one person”: Any one of you may go, but not all of you.

Anyone means “anybody, any person at all”: Anyone can win a lottery.

anyway/anywhere/nowhere/anyways/anywheres/nowheres

Anyway, anywhere, and nowhere are the correct forms.

apart/a part

Apart is an adverb meaning “in pieces”: My plan for my vacation fell apart due the sudden death of my boss .

A part is a noun meaning “one section of”: A part of my heart left when he died.

appraise/apprise

Appraise is to assess or estimate the worth of: to appraise a diamond.

Apprise is to inform or notify: the officer apprised us of our rights.

arcane/archaic

Arcane refers to things known and understood by few people: Annu teaches philosophic  theories of modern religion at the college.

Archaic refers to things very, very old and outdated: The Oxford English Dictionary contains many words that are archaic.

as/like

As may be used as a conjunction that introduce dependent clauses: George talks as his father does. Informally, it may also be used as a preposition in comparative constructions like: He is as forgetful as me (or as I am).

Like is a preposition is followed by a noun or pronoun: George looks like his mother. It may also be used as an adjective meaning “similar”: George and I have like minds.

ascent/assent

Ascent is an upward movement: Lina’s ascent to the presidency of the company came slowly.

Assent means “to agree to”: Geeta could not begin the project unless management assented.

ascetic/aesthetic

An ascetic is a person who renounces all material comforts, often for religious devotion: the young man lead     his ascetic lifestyle despite his parents’ plans for him. It can also be used as an adjective: The young man  led an ascetic lifestyle which gave a lot of pain to his parents.

Aesthetic refers to the philosophy of beauty or the pleasing qualities of something: The statue created  by the novice was lacking in aesthetic qualities.

ascribe/describe

Ascribe means “to attribute to”: She ascribed her feelings of jealousy to insecurity.

Describe means “to show what something is by drawing a picture with words”: Describe in detail what the man looked like.

aspersion/dispersion

Aspersion is slander, a damaging remark: The campaign was filled with one aspersion after another.

Dispersion is the act of scattering: The dispersion of seeds was irregular because he sowed the seeds by hand.

assistance/assistants

Assistance is help or aid: the nurses gave assistance to the patients.

Assistants are more than one assistant, a person who gives help: the emergency room assistants were ready to help anyone who came through the door.

assure/ensure/insure

Assure means “to guarantee”: He assured her it was a quality item.

Ensure means “to make sure by double checking”: The custodian ensured the doors to the school were locked at night.

Insure means “to provide insurance”: It is wise to insure your house against flood, fire, or theft.

 

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